Anastasia Kaufman - ABR, SFR, GRI, CDPE - RE/MAX Town & Country | Lincoln, RI Real Estate



44 Otis Street, Mansfield, MA 02048

Single-Family

$529,900
Price

10
Rooms
4
Beds
3
Baths
Wonderful, well maintained, oversized open-concept raised ranch. In law potential with separate 1st floor master bedroom space or lower level with full bath! 4 bed, 3 full bath, modern updates throughout. Beautiful hardwoods through entire main living area and massive master suite, which also features an elegant and spacious sitting area and two generous walk-in closet spaces. Granite counters in master bathroom and main bathroom. Kitchen recently updated with granite, tumbled tile backsplash and new stainless appliances. Lower level has two recreation room spaces, perfect for use as a theatre room / gathering area (with built-in shelving) or huge playroom, full bath with shower, and laundry room and mudroom off the garage.. Beautiful fenced yard, oversized multi-leveldeck off back sliding doors. Additional features include central air, newer oil furnace (Weil McLain Gold), two year old single-layer roof, and a newer shed in rear which remains with property.
Open House
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Wonderful, well maintained, oversized open-concept raised ranch. In law potential with separate 1st floor master bedroom space or lower level with full bath! 4 bed, 3 full bath, modern updates throughout. Beautiful hardwoods through entire main living area and massive master suite, which also features an elegant and spacious sitting area and two generous walk-in closet spaces. Granite counters in master bathroom and main bathroom. Kitchen recently updated with granite, tumbled tile backsplash and new stainless appliances. Lower level has two recreation room spaces, perfect for use as a theatre room / gathering area (with built-in shelving) or huge playroom, full bath with shower, and laundry room and mudroom off the garage.. Beautiful fenced yard, oversized multi-leveldeck off back sliding doors. Additional features include central air, newer oil furnace (Weil McLain Gold), two year old single-layer roof, and a newer shed in rear which remains with property.

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A new study quantifying the impact of curb appeal found that the attractiveness of a home can boost its value by 7% or more
 

Want to get top dollar for your house? Mow the lawn.

In a recent study in the Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, researchers at the University of Alabama and the University of Texas at Arlington used deep learning and Google Street View to determine just how much curb appeal contributes to a home’s value.

Analyzing Google Street View photos and sales data from 88,980 properties in the greater Denver area, the researchers determined that on average a home with excellent curb appeal sold for 7% more than a similar house in the same neighborhood with poor curb appeal. In slow real-estate markets (when buyers can afford to be choosier), that premium rose to as high as 14%.

That 7% figure also factors in the state of the home across the street, which accounted for roughly a third of the overall premium. So, pick your neighbors carefully.

Granted, the notion that people prefer a nice yard isn’t exactly surprising, but while the findings aren’t game changing, the way the researchers arrived at them could be, says Sriram Villupuram, an associate professor at UT Arlington and author of the study along with Erik Johnson and Alan Tidwell from the University of Alabama.


“It’s observable, but not quantifiable,” Dr. Villupuram says. “And we have tried to change that with this paper.”
Everyone knows that curb appeal affects a property’s value, but actually quantifying that impact presents a challenge, Dr. Villupuram notes. Data on things like bedroom count, square footage and lot size are easily obtainable for most homes and are commonly incorporated into appraisers’ models. Curb appeal, on the other hand, is more difficult and labor intensive to account for, with assessments often requiring in-person visits.

To get at the question of curb appeal, the researchers manually scored a set of properties, grading 400 images on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1 indicating the lowest appeal and 4 the highest. Low-appeal properties had blemishes like broken pavement and overgrown grass, while high-appeal properties were characterized by features like well-kept lawns and nice landscaping.

The researchers then used these scored images to train their deep-learning algorithm to assign curb-appeal values. Lastly, they used the algorithm to grade the photos in the larger data set.

Comparing sales prices of homes with good curb appeal to those with bad curb appeal (and controlling for factors like neighborhood, time of sale, and house size and features) they arrived at their finding of a premium of 7%.

The goal, Dr. Villupuram says, is to automate assessments of curb appeal, which could make it easier for large investors, banks and institutions like Fannie Mae to include these assessments in their property appraisals.

The algorithm isn’t perfect. In the study, it assigned curb appeal correctly about 66% of the time when compared with manually scored photos. Using larger and more geographically diverse data sets to train the algorithm should boost its accuracy, Dr. Villupuram notes.

“There’s definitely room for improvement,” he says.

Speaking of which—you rake those leaves up yet?

Article link: https://on.wsj.com/2tB4QN8


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GP: House for sale, open house sign 171203
An ‘Open House’ sign is displayed as potential home buyers arrive at a property for sale in Columbus, Ohio.
Ty Wright | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Homeowners rushed to take advantage of the sharp drop in interest rates last week.

Refinance demand pushed mortgage application volume up 5% for the week to the highest level since 2013, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s seasonally adjusted index. Purchase demand, however, dropped.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($510,400 or less) decreased to 3.71% from 3.81%, with points remaining unchanged at 0.28 (including the origination fee) for loans with a 20% down payment. That is the lowest level since October 2016. The rate was 98 basis points higher one year ago.

“The 10-year Treasury yield fell around 20 basis points over the course of last week, driven mainly by growing concerns over a likely slowdown in Chinese economic growth from the spread of the coronavirus. This drove mortgage rates lower, with the 30-year fixed rate decreasing for the fifth time in six weeks,” said Joel Kan, MBA’s associate vice president of economic and industry forecasting.

Refinance applications, which are most sensitive to weekly rate moves, jumped 15% for the week and were 183% higher than a year ago. Demand hit the highest level since June 2013. The average loan amount also spiked, as homeowners with jumbo loans have more to gain from weekly rate declines. The refinance share of mortgage activity increased to 64.5% of total applications from 60.4% the previous week.

Mortgage applications to purchase a home decreased 10% from one week earlier, but were 11% higher annually. Today’s buyers are facing a tight and increasingly pricey housing market. The supply of homes for sale fell to a record low at the end of last year, and price gains, which had been easing a bit, have reaccelerated again.

“Prospective buyers weren’t as responsive to the decline in mortgage rates — likely because of suppressed supply levels,” Kan said. “Purchase applications took a step back, but still remained 7.7% higher than a year ago.”

Mortgage rates have been falling on fears over the coronavirus hitting financial markets. Rates, however, finally turned slightly higher Tuesday, as the stock market bounced higher.

“The bigger issue is merely the risk that today [Tuesday] marks some sort of turning point in the bigger picture,” said Matthew Graham, chief operating officer of Mortgage News Daily. “It’s too soon to know if that’s what this is, but it’s definitely the first obvious candidate since the coronavirus rate-drop began.”


Watch my youtube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrJ_RQ936evOTUDiWFMOarg

Visit my facebook account here: https://www.facebook.com/AnastasiaRealtor/

Download Anastasia's Smart Home Finder App here: http://87778.mobi/REANAS


Photo by p_kennedy123 via Pixabay

You don't have to be an interior designer to bring color and life into a home when you put it on the market. And you certainly don't have to drop thousands of dollars to hire a professional stager, either. For most properties, a few staging basics can make all the difference between a hollow, echoing home and one that prospective buyers can actually imagine living in.

These top tips won't cost you much money, time or effort, but they can make a big impact. 

1. Hang up towels. 

Colorful, soft towels on the racks in the bathroom soften the space's edges and make it feel like an actual washroom. The same goes for the kitchen: choose a few simple, trendy tea towels to hang up in the kitchen to soften up the space. If there's a space to hang a towel, fill it. 

2. Place a few rugs. 

An empty living area will always benefit from a large rug, even if you're not staging with any furniture. A mostly-white space can take a colorful, trendy rug, so don't hesitate to choose something lively to make your living room feel a little more alive. A rug in the kitchen and bathrooms can also work wonders for those rooms. 

3. Add some color. 

Toss a colorful throw across the foot of a bed. Place a bowl of fruit on the kitchen island. Add a few fresh flowers to a vase in each bathroom. These small touches don't cost much, but add a personal touch that transforms the way visitors view a space. 

4. Put a wreath on the front door and a new doormat at the entrance. 

An in-season wreath or "welcome home" sign feels far more homey than a blank door with a realtor's lock gracing the doorknob. Add a fresh, new door mat and a large potted plant if you have room for it, and suddenly you've created a warm, welcoming entryway. 

5. Minimize. 

When in doubt, go with less. This is particularly important--and challenging--if you're selling your primary residence. You'll want your space to be as neat, clutter-free and open as possible. Box up excess stuff and put it in storage if necessary so your closets and storage spaces aren't filled to capacity. 

If you find yourself listing multiple properties at a time, you'll quickly develop a quick-staging system--and a collection of a few key items you can use to stage practically any home you list.

Here's an added caveat about hiring a pro. Look at comps in your neighborhood as you firm up your approach for your property. Historic homes and niche homes in choice neighborhoods sometimes all but require a full staging to appeal to the buyers you want to attract. If you're certain it's worth it, by all means, make the investment. Otherwise, mini-stage it yourself using the tips above, and wait for the offers to roll in. 




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